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you indicate that the unemployment rate, in his current environment, with 6.7% -- with longer unemployment, is not like 6.6% unemployment in normal times? >> but mike, how do you communicate that? >> it will be difficult to do that and you will have speeches you make to give people guidance on what is going forward. i want to ask about the statement of inflation not being a problem. betting that inflation will rise over the coming months and the question is, how much is slack is there. on bloomberg surveillance tomorrow -- they argued it -- he will argue, this is much more dangerous than people think. saywill see chairman yellen that they will follow strict policy that will look at the labor market for reasons that we mentioned but this is not the only thing they will look at. they will go day to day to make sure they are not too soft. >> what kind of market can ben bernanke handoff to janet yellen? >> i would much rather be in her spot than his spot in 2008. i think that ben bernanke did a wonderful job of communicating that we are moving to tapering, and handing chairperson
, effectively? >> well, it's hard. it's going to be a significant trading range environment. the market will correct back on a repeating basis. we'll get a period where the market doesn't accomplish a heck of a lot. that's all you should expect. >> you watched janet yellen yesterday. did he provide the confidence that you would have wanted? and the reason i ask is because historically, if you just do the math, every time we get a new chair in this role, we usually have some form of a correction within six months. and the question that i keep wondering is whether we have that correction or it's still to come. >> i think, you know, investors tend to react to the unexpected, not the expected. and yesterday, the messaging was steady as she goes. so i think for now, we're in good shape. the march meeting, unless data falls off the cliff, investors will expect and will treat another $10 billion in tapering to occur. so i think we hand off from bernanke to yellen in this case may be a little different. because she was pretty much on tune with the dovishness of the fed and there hasn't been a f
, radio shack had a tough time in that environment, 4.5%, cutting the management they don't need, and earnings per share beating profit on a ride so sales were still little tricky but stock is doing well. adam: the s and p is on track for record close and the dow is climbing back from earlier losses, 35 points, mixed economic news. turmoil in ukraine, testimony on the hill, an opportunity to address concerns regarding recent soft economic data. >> since my appearance before the house committee on number of data releases point to softer spending. part of that softness may reflect weather conditions. is difficult to discern how much. adam: joining us is oppenheimer funds chief economist, how much of a player is the weather in the south economic data? >> they asked me to come back in april or may and i will tell you. if you didn't buy a house you didn't buy a car because of a blizzard, you might buy it later on. you didn't go out to dinner, that is pretty much spending this law so it is hard to say i was looking at history of past times, got a fight after a particularly bad winters,
a better environment. >> why? so many companies run so poorly? >> i think you have a market that is fair value, plus or minus. it is not overshadowed particularly. corporate are healthy. financials are well capitalized. interest rates are low. company balance sheets are filled with cash. private equities trading over one billion dollars. unclogged capital commitments. ironically in environment where you have low growth means that they are much more receptive to value trading ideas. that lends itself to a very fertile environment for what we do. take one case example. yesterday you filed a 13 tnd with one of your companies, huge, employees 60,000 people. you want to talk to the board about pretty much everything, right? management, capital structure, other stuff. what ultimately are you trying to achieve here you go -- achieve here you go -- achieve here? several pretty much everything. >> is there that much wrong with the company? >> there are a lot of things right with the company. but all of those things you articulated -- i'm very confident we will be able to work things out amicably.
to run my state the bay i want to. let me make the environment such that i can promote jobs in my own state. i don't need the federal government doing this for me. >> but i think you need to look at the entire tax code. do you realize -- >> but you shouldn't be paying 15% when people making less than you are paying a higher rate. >> but if i -- >> that nibt be the case for you. you pit it in harm's way, you're investing it? >> that's another way to say it. >> depending on what you're doing could be putting it in harm's way to lose it. >> put in bitcoins. >> but when you're putting other people's money in harm's way, this goes back to what we talked about before, as the private equity manager, why is that -- why is that the not a commission oriented business? >> when you see somebody make $500 million of which a large portion of it is in carried pictures. that's what private equity is. i redeploy it all the time. i'm constantly buying new deals. why would you want me to stop doing that? >> it's not a matter of punishing you. it's a matter of giving you special status. and i'm not argui
agitating these days. stay with us because i want to ,alk about the deal environment this onslaught of investor activism we are seeing. sweeneynging in paul and merger arbitrage strategist. let's start with joseph a bank in this saga that is going on in the men's retail sector. it is interesting they seem to be going back-and-forth. ultimately, who wins? >> i've been covering this from the beginning. i am more than aware of what is going on. the biggest issue here is the timing. when you look at the release, it said we need to do this quickly. if you're going to give us your best offer, give it to us right now because if you're not, we will close this eddie bauer d eal. that is what is happening now and they need the due diligence to increase the price to $65 and maybe more. it is not $65 in cash. it could be stock. men's wearhouse has the door open to close this transaction. activist fieldhe with ebay and paypal. is rattling the cages on almost a daily basis. he was on with me a couple of against pushing heavily the paypal spinoff. one thing he is trying to get investors to pay att
)-right-paren so they are savvy in the global media environment. >> if they become more influential in the post 14 afghanistan or if they are candidates that are sympathetic and win a seat or two if they are going to be a part of the game or if they are going to be fighting, which i guess they are in some places. if they might somehow get engaged in governing, could they possibly tolerate other voices? can be mature to the level they allow other people to speak as well as them in a more serious afghanistan than the one they ran previously. >> the short answer of that is probably not. there's a lot of wishful thinking that has gone on about the telegram. you could imagine that a woman's are in the political process but they are a relatively small part of that equation. i think the single biggest wild card is what the pakistanis do a serious military operation in north was there a -- wasserstein and the people that have been told has reached the point where the sharif government has said we are serious and that could change for the telegram if they no longer have a safe haven or they
to incentives and health systems incentive changes, to less expensive environments that include clinics and home care. we're in the midst of a big transition overall. >> what is it that your company does exactly when you go in and try and streamline things? >> we're a performance improvement company that focuses on cost, in other words, how you procure all products. we have a $5 billion procurement business that helps hospitals buy what they buy, more importantly, how they use the products. there's a best practice out there but it's not used across the country. we take the process to what we know as best practices. >> you're trying to get people paid quicker, right? i mean, there's a million places to attack. are there too many -- what are your two or three primary ways of doing it? you can get bogged down being all things to all people. >> hospitals aline are over a trillion dollars vertically integrated in 5,000 locations, all very complex and all very different. we focus on cost reduction, clinical integration and payment and price integration so that what's being paid for the services render
to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. liz: shares of best buy on the move to be profit expectations lee janzen analyst at janney montgomery scott, you were on a conference, what did you hear that surprise you? >> 18 months ago this country everyone thought was going out of business, actually argued today. and hybrid models are out there that the investments they make, the ones they're working on, making tough to compete with online. liz: will they have o downstairs' their retail store even more? >> they have markets where they have more density of stores than they need and over time it is inevitable that will happen. there taking hours out of the store because 12% of their business is now online. some productivity you don't need as much investment in energy and a. liz: the chart looks negative, the stock fell off a cliff. you sound positive. is there an opportunity? >> it is an opportunity. proof of concept will come in queue 4. even though they had lower number
world and they're going to continue to do so. >> are we still in a low interest rate environment despite the fact the fed is tapering? is that your assessment? >> i am quite sure we'll will be in a low interest rate environment. confidence,more , westing more into equities brought in richard buxton and his team and he has ready well -- his ability and pounds his ability and pounds over the last six months. we're seeing people invest more. end of the day, you do not get much return if you've got cash or fixed interest. looks what can you do to counter that -- >> what can you do to counter that when yields remain low? what are you doing to counter that. >> we look at our customers and look at their risk tolerances and we decide -- designed to portfolios to meet those risks. if you're willing to take a bit more risks, they're our alternative products. we believe advice is really important for people. -- we are buying the largest network of restricted an independent financial advisers because we think our proposition is good for solutions. we believe we can expand our offering in the u.k.. >
being the low interest-rate environment. qwest also, companies are doing well. our corporate clients are doing nicely. >> are they willing to spend? you are an advertising guy. spends expected to grow by three or four percent. i think the uncertainty about the fiscal policy is --sing corporations >> what would give you more confidence that you know exactly what to expect about taxation policy and health care reform, etc.. there is no indication about what the final outcome would be. 70% of the business are outside of america. they are in china and russia and brazil. those markets are growing. each one differently, but china, i read yesterday, seven or eight percent growth in the economy. not nine or 10% of where it was. i do not see anything on the horizon. there is nothing on the horizon that gives you consternation and says the fundamentals of the --nomy >> the fed has been it's a much money. qwest we produced a surplus. you noticed the fiscal reform has been so uncertain. as a result, they cut expenses. the canadian mindset is you have to have a bounce budget. qwest we have john k
is already baked in? >> the obamacare regulatory environment is one element of the change in health care where the cost of health care will continue to go up and software is a fundamental way to address that. we have been very active selling companies to the larger participants as they look to build up rotter solutions. >> what other subsectors of tax are hot right now? >> infrastructure software broadly. like sapy solutions and oracle. i think you can see companies like ca trying to change itself or companies that have gone private that are trying to transform companies to deliver solutions into the small and medium-size companies in the marketplace. >> one of the stocks we like to talk about is tesla. morgan stanley doubled their price target. would you buy tesla? >> i'm a technology banker and a big car guy, so i love the stock, does it have the chops to develop the solutions that? that is an unknown. it's interesting at risk dollars that may lay out in a big way or may not. it?ould you buy >> no. >> a lot of analysts still have a bye on it. we are on the market again and 30 minutes.
. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving, so when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe. i had people who encouraged me. not just my mom and grandparents but wonderful teachers and community leaders. they never gave up on me. and so i didn't give up on myself. >> reporter: after five years in office the plight of black and latino men and boys has the president's attention. his new initiative hopes to build on the successes of programs like kip high school in the bronx. this year 100% of its seniors have applied to college. >> i think that young men of color face a stacked deck. >> reporter: ramon dejesus is a kip counselor. he was the first in his family to graduate from high school and then college. mr. obama, he says, that cuts through. >> his appearance, that's all the kids need. he doesn't have to say a word. i am the president of the united states. don't i kind of look like you? >> reporter: adrian portella is one of dejesus's mentees. four colleges have already accepted him and he's waiting for more. >> i really w
into cyclicals as we go forward at a low inflationary environment with the fed struggling. sgr >> financials were getting a little bit of a bid. maybe it was a rotation out of the over valued names. want to go back to the main point as we head into the close close. the dow is off almost 250 points. >> bear in mind, 1848 for ages, for weeks and weeks we were trying to break through the new highs, 1848. stutter steps, we finally got there then 1850 would sas resis. finally yesterday we were decisively over that. you get these stutter steps up and back. it's not -- it hasn't been a straight line up but so far since the end of january, we've been doing pretty well. february was a great month. >> the market has been pretty much straight up for the last couple weeks after that big pullback earlier this year, and i think we may be in for some more jitters. i agree with my colleagues here that, you know, some of it has to do with the weekend and the news in the ukraine, but i think there's a lot of geopolitical uncertainty. 21 elections coming up. there may be some excuses for a little pullback. >> subpr
modify aircrafts to make it more like a home environment. increaseden an emphasis on noise reduction in aircrafts. a sound level would only allow you to have good speech interaction within one feet of each other. we have 47 decibels. they communicate 16 feet easily. once it was identify that you could get lower, we rely, alessio far we can go. we apply a continuous and uninterrupted barrier of installation -- insulation. we isolate the component that passed through the barriers. we also have to treat the systems within the barrier already. ventilation fans and whatnot. it is about optimization. more we add, the more weight you add to the aircraft. this would be what would typically come on aircraft. but we develop an whole new only two thirds of the way, it is 10 decibels quieter or half the noise level. interior,f the basic it would be $25 million range. we will have a wide body aircraft. 747, that is just what we do from the interior completion standpoint. class coming up, the bank of nova scotia will be in the spotlight. we will speak to the ceo about the first-quarter earnings re
environment for security and i think this is one of the things we can help bring our customers. when we show up with our technology, we're bringing our security platform with it. i think that helps customers knowing that we're there to partner with this in this new security gam bit. >> one of the things you ought me is the holy trinity. it's not right now because of connectivity. tell me why it should matter. >> we have been talking about, number one, cloud computing. you don't have to buy software or hardware. can you run the business exact lie like you use your g-mail or any other internet service. number two, facebook has redefined the social paradigm and we can use that to run our business. number three, mobile, the phone is everything. i want to do it all on the phone. but number four is this, i'll highlight it with a story. a couple weeks ago i wasn't feeling well, i had a cold in san francisco, it was a chilly day and going to a trip to the world economic forum. i got a phone call from my friend michael dell. he said are you not feeling very well? i said no but how did you know that?
months. quite how much longer can insurers endure this slow rate environment? it has to be painful. >> having said that, not all insurers are in the same position. zurich, we are starting to prepare for a low-interest environment. we came off of it in 2008, we had to make little changes to profitability. we chose to defend it, that was a very strong managing good we have less sensibility to low-interest rates than other countries, which probably will have more challenging times ahead. short interest rates continue to remain where they are. in other words, moving into a japanese scenario. thatarting to dustin and -- infrastructure of real estate. would you take more risk on so-called hard assets if you could? >> as part of my strategy for the economy, considering all of the assets, i would take moderately more risk. when you do that, we have also decided to move a part of our liquid assets into lesly quit assets. talking about infrastructure, i --uld dress that the world stressed that the world takes infrastructure loans, and some of the more risky assets modestly increase our quart
focusing on cutting costs, changing management, buying back this environment. it looks as though the process is working. profitable trades earned almost $2 billion in assets. 8.88% in thel down last few months. there are still better stocks out there in the universe. fund they run is still losing money. fund that relies on computer algorithms. they are still sounding a little bit cautious. do not get carried away. 11.6% -- the best day for man group. indeed. you very much caroline hyde, our european business correspondent. flights will be available to the for 10 euros.r margin for wpp hurt. how janet yellen would like to offer the fed's guidance. weaker than forecast data. the economy may be starting to slow. in part from the harsh weather. after the break, we will go to our top interview of the day. lego's ceo. he is live in denmark. soundyou want to hear the of 2000 pieces of legos? it is pretty noisy. i will be back with an interview with lego's ceo. stick around. ♪ >> welcome back. you were watching "the pulse." continuing tensions surrounding the ukraine continues to have
it better environment for private investment and international energy agency's have estimated that it is in the trillions of dollars, the infrastructure investment, to man come in to develop our resources of energy in the u.s.. do investors look at president obama's infrastructure proposal with any degree of belief or is it something that they say it has been proposed, we will write it off? are looking at all of these intersections all of the time. about hownking a lot frompolicy in washington, the fed to defense spending, affect the markets? , you your hope and prayer are the queen of a higher oil price and you got it right. does it drive higher here? libya -- their production is out. if they cannot get the barrels back on, we will be in a higher priced situation. you need to watch the iraqi elections coming up in april. one thing to watch in the downside is the iranian nuclear negotiation. to the the risks are upside in terms of geopolitics. >> i want to bring it back to janet yellen testifying later today. what do you expect to hear from her that might move the markets? >>
dissonant. with that part of your thinking going in? that you wanted to create this environment that was not like happy feel-good music? the whole job from my point of view is to take you up in space with ryan and the lead character. if she was feeling overwhelmed, we needed the audience to feel like that. you look at everything you could do. always following the story and taking the audience on the journey. a let me ask you about being composer nowadays. did you think as a kid you were going to grow up and be a composer, or do you see that as the best outlet for you to now?ss creativity in music >> the main music was a thing from very young. anded to love songwriting that kind of thing. and in their early 20's i got my first job with a film composer. it was only when i started moving music around that i realized what is it could do to a story and this light went on. it after youte see a video or sometimes after you see a clip? >> sometimes you have a few thematic ideas. for me, it is always when the movie is there and you can see the performances. all of these different things
thoughts about the investing environment right now. are these sectors the ones that are responsible for the profits? >> a big chunk of it. another piece of the equation is -- there was not , lot of bad weather last year so the claims they faced should be lower. thank you so much. we appreciate that look into berkshire hathaway. we are a few minutes from the opening bell. we have your top 10 traits. keep it right here on "in the loop." ♪ >> will come back. you are "in the loop." i am alix steel. bloomberg television is on the markets. scarlet fu has the latest. >> durable goods came in a little bit better than anticipated. the nasdaq futures are still up slightly. the s&p rose above its closing high but it was unable to hold onto that game yesterday -- gain yesterday. is still stronger, but cutting off its earlier level. imf put out a statement -- the ukraine notified the imf and the imf is ready to respond. we will continue to monitor that story as well. we are on the markets again in 30 minutes. >> let's count down to the open with your top 10 stocks. scarlet stays with us and ol
environment. >> the idea zero return goes to charles plosser. do we have challenges in investment? do low interest rates distort american finance? i think there are a lot of people that complain. is worried that we distort various price signals. >> you worry about chronic low interest rates. >> how long will it take before the pressures of that begin to show up and financial stability and capital going where does not need to go. the more central banks around the world and the fed try to distort the signals, the distortions build up over time. >> capital going places, being turned around quickly. not much sign of the traditional money velocity. there is a ratio of how much money is in the system. that has more to do with other things. i do not think that is driving the search for yield that we see. bank loans have fallen. they are up a little bit. are there optimistic signs that things have turned or are starting to turn? economy is in better shape than it has been in a couple of years. man i have never been one to protect that we're going to see four percent or five percent growth out of
by the biological parents. i don't have a problem with that. if all you are donating is the healthy environment in which the traits that belong to two biological parents are to grow, that seems okay to me. stuart: it will be taking a bit further, won't it? you are getting designer babies. >> now allow anonymous and oregon donation. it deprives the offspring of knowing their biological parents. will not even consider this. donate or over him. so is a kid doesn't know who the dad or mom is. what o you need to know that for? it is the key to who you are spiritually, medically. stuart: i am with you all the way. i'm not sure i see a way of banning it and stopping it when it gets to that kind of situation. how do you stop that? i'm going to touch on one of your favorite subjects. social media apps. you are not a fan of social media, but in this case social media is organizing tyrus. surely you are relaxed an and to some aspects of facebook are terrific, won't you? >> no, i won't. if you can't bear to get on the phone or pass a handwritten note to get it done, is this even a real call? literally you
, the gist of it is the keystone pipeline effect would have very little impact on the environment. but yet they have still come out saying this report was bias. saying it was handled properly and sometimes was more rigorous than required. this thing hands down, it will certainly get built. stuart: very strict. >> you don't want it shipped. which would be ridiculous. stuart: it would be ridiculous. come on, charles. charles: build it and you can export it. stuart: you say he will do that. charles: i think so. stuart: senator harry reid calling the horror stories untrue. not so fast, listen to the senator on the senate floor yesterday. >> she works, she has maintained a number of part-time jobs, has a masters degree and then she says once it was passed, she said i saw the writing on the wall and so did the companies i work for. stuart: the senator joins us now from capitol hill. we just ran a clip from what you are saying on the show yesterday. in the constituent hurt economically and i take it you object to calling her a liar. correct? >> absolutely. he cannot handle the truth. we have been
, senator, i agree that environment of low rates, low interest rates, especially when it prevails for a long time and we have had a long period of low interest rates, can give rise to behavior that poses threats to financial stability. and, therefore, we need to be looking at that very carefully. and we are doing so in a very thoroughfare way, i believe. there are a number of things that we are monitoring. measures of asset prices and whether or not they appear to be diverging from historical norms, namely it's hard but we're trying to spot any asset bubbles, price bubbles that might be emerging. we're looking at leverage which build up in leverage can be very dangerous to the financial system and pose stability risks. we're looking at trends in leverage. we're looking at credit growth to see whether or not that has potentially worrisome trends. in addition to that, we're looking particularly through our stress tests, at financial institutions and a low-interest rate environment. we have to worry about whether or not they're appropriately dealing with interest rate risk. we have been looking
a problem for kids living in some of the world's harsher environments. that is, until now. >> i was watching a news story, heartbreaking news story about the polite of children in war decency and refugee camps. it was explaining that the simplest and most effective therapy to bring them back to humanity was just a play, simple, unstructured play. >> that was all the inspiration tim needed. he knew there were programs sending soccer balls to developing and third world communities, but he also knew that those soccer balls didn't last very long in the harsh playing fields often found in those communities. he imagined a solution. >> to make a ball for these children that would never go flat so they could play and get that per pi. >> he is a a a lyricist by trade. 11 months and two tries later, the one world football project created a nearly indestructible ball made from unique cross ling cell foam that doesn't need to be inflated. >> when done you had something that could work? >> the very first thing they said was a total failure. when i took it out of the box, i threw it on the ground and it b
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26